Tanium partners with Oracle to offer cloud-based endpoint management, security


Tanium, a company that makes endpoint management and endpoint security products, is partnering with Oracle to bolster its flagship SaaS platform, the companies said Thursday. 

Tanium is investing in cloud-based services to extend its business to more mid-market enterprises. Endpoint management and security will become more important to small and mid-market enterprises as more embrace dispersed workforce strategies.

The 10 year-old company already has a wide customer base among the largest networks in the world, including multiple branches of the US Armed Forces and most major financial institutions. 

“If you have over 100,000 endpoints, you probably are a Tanium customer,” Ryan Andorfer, VP of cloud computing at Tanium, told ZDNet. “At that scale, the way that our products work is just differentiated.” 

Tanium built its business for large enterprises by focusing on speed, he explained.  Its architecture allows customers to retrieve arbitrary data from millions of endpoints within 15 seconds, and it allows them to distribute data to those endpoints quickly. It effectively offers self-forming content distribution networks within wide area networks, Andorfer said. The Tanium portfolio of security and endpoint management products sit on top of this core technology. 

The company launched Tanium-as-a-Service last year to “meet more of the market where they are now,” Andorfer said. Along with Oracle, they’re currently using Amazon Web Services to deliver the SaaS platform. 

Tanium has also established partnerships with other public cloud providers. It provides endpoint security telemetry for Chronicle, Google’s security analytics platform. Tanium also supports Google’s zero-trust solution with endpoint identity information. The company is also working with IBM Cloud to build joint services for highly-regulated industries. 

Tanium opted to work with Oracle to deliver Tanium-as-a-Service in part because of their approach to security and in part because of its performance at the edge, Andorfer said.



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